What’s the difference between giraffe manure and zebra manure?

What’s the difference between giraffe manure and zebra manure? Manure is also known as dung, poop, poo, or droppings.

Giraffes and zebras are both ungulate mammals.

Giraffes and zebras are both herbivores, because they both eat vegetation.

Specifically, giraffes are ruminant browsers, eating bushes, leaves, and branches of trees, whereas zebras are cecal grazers, eating mainly grass.

Giraffes have manure similar in texture to sheep manure, whereas zebra manure is similar in texture to horse manure.

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What’s the difference between Zebras: Common Zebra, Grevy’s Zebra and Chapman’s Zebra

What’s the difference between the Common Zebra, Grevy’s Zebra, and Chapman’s Zebra?

The Common Zebra (Equus burchellii) and the Grévy’s Zebra (Equus grevyi) both have black and white stripes, whereas the Chapman’s Zebra (Equus burchellii antiquorum) has brown and white stripes with a “shadow” grey stripe.

The Common Zebra and the Chapman’s Zebra look more like short-legged horses, whereas the Grévy’s Zebra looks more like a mule.

The Common Zebra and the Chapman’s Zebra have wider stripes than the Grévy’s Zebra.

The Common Zebra and the Chapman’s Zebra have stripes on their belly, whereas the Grévy’s Zebra has a white unstriped belly.

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Chapman’s Zebra

The Chapman’s Zebra (Equus burchellii antiquorum) is found in Angola and Namibia. It is an ungulate (a hoofed mammal). It is a subspecies of the Common Zebra or Plains Zebra.

The Chapman’s Zebra is like a horse or pony with short legs. It has dark brown stripes (not black stripes like other zebras). They also have pale grey “shadow’ stripes. In addition, its legs are only partially striped, whereas other zebras have stripes that continue all the way to their hooves. Its nose is grey to black.

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Grevy’s Zebra

The Grévy’s Zebra (Equus grevyi) is an ungulate (hoofed) mammal in the Equidae family of horses and zebras. It is also known as the Imperial Zebra. 

The Grévy’s Zebra is black and white striped, like the Common Zebra, with stripes all the way to its hooves, but it is taller and the stripes are narrower. It does not have stripes on its belly – its belly is white. It looks more like an ass or a mule, rather than a horse. It has a large head, with large ears. Its nose is pale grey to brown, and its lips have whiskers. Its mane is tall and stands up.

It is the largest of the wild equines. It can grow to 2.5 metres (8.2 feet) tall.

It is only found in the semi-arid grasslands of northern Kenya and Ethiopia.

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Common Zebra

The Common Zebra (Equus quagga, formerly Equus burchellii) is also known as the Plains Zebra or Burchell’s Zebra. It is common in the treeless plains of East Africa to almost southern Africa. It is an ungulate (a hoofed mammal).

The Common Zebra is like a horse or pony with short legs, and is black and white striped. The stripes continue all the way to its hooves. No two zebras are alike, as they all have slightly different markings. Its nose is grey to black.

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