RESEARCH: Elephant trunks use extreme suction to suck up water quickly: faster than a human sneeze

Extreme suction helps elephants suck up water quickly, and to hold water and food in their trunks. Extreme suction enables elephants to inhale water at speeds nearly 30 times faster than humans exhale air during a sneeze.

New Scientist magazine, on 2 June 2021, announced recent research results on the effectiveness of elephants using extreme suction. Elephants use their trunks, which weigh more than 100 kilograms (220 pounds), in a variety of ways: to forage through vegetation for food, to drink, and even as a snorkel when wading through deep water.

To better understand the trunk in action, scientist Andrew Schulz at the Georgia Institute of Technology in America, and his colleagues, filmed a 34-year-old female African Savannah Elephant (Loxodonta africana) while she completed a series of tests at a zoo in Atlanta.

Continue reading “RESEARCH: Elephant trunks use extreme suction to suck up water quickly: faster than a human sneeze”

What is the difference between the Brazilian Tapir and the Malayan Tapir?

What is the difference between the Brazilian or Lowland Tapir (Tapirus terrestris) and the Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus)? 

The Brazilian Tapir and the Malayan Tapir are both ungulate (hoofed) mammals in the Tapiridae family of tapirs and bush cows. They are related to the horse and the rhinoceros.

Continue reading “What is the difference between the Brazilian Tapir and the Malayan Tapir?”

Asian Elephant

The Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus) is a large land mammal.

The Asian Elephant has grey, almost hairless, wrinkled skin over its body. Its nose is a long trunk, its ears are fan-like flaps, and its tail is short. It has small dark eyes, a small mouth, and large forward and upturned ivory tusks. Females usually do not have tusks, but might have barely visible tushes (seen only when the mouth is open).

Its legs are thick with large pads for feet. Its front feet have a round sole, and the hind (back) feet have an oval-shaped sole. Its feet have distinct nail-like structures on each foot.

Continue reading “Asian Elephant”

African Elephant

The African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) is the largest land mammal on Earth.

The African Elephant has grey, almost hairless, wrinkled skin over its massive body. Its nose is a long trunk, its ears are large fan-like flaps, and its tail is short with a tuft of dark hair at the end. It has small dark eyes, a small mouth, and large forward and upturned ivory tusks. Both males and females have tusks, but female tusks are smaller.

Its legs are thick with large pads for feet. Its front feet have a round sole, and the hind (back) feet have an oval-shaped sole.

Continue reading “African Elephant”

Malayan Tapir

The Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus) is also called the Asian Tapir, and is the largest of all the tapirs. It is related to horses and rhinoceroses. It is an ungulate (hoofed) mammal.

The Malayan Tapir is black with a dull-white strip of fur from its shoulders to its tail. It has a short prehensile trunk (like an elephant’s trunk but much shorter). Its trunk can grab branches and leaves or pick fruit from trees. It has a low crest of hair from the crown down the back of the neck. Its round, dark ears have white edges. Its tail is short and stubby.

They have hoofed feet (hooves). They have four toes on their front feet and three toes on their back feet.

Continue reading “Malayan Tapir”

Brazilian Tapir

The Brazilian Tapir (Tapirus terrestris) is a mammal in the Tapiridae family. It is also called the South American Tapir, the Amazon Tapir, and the Lowland Tapir. It is the largest land mammal in the Amazon. It is related to horses and rhinoceroses. It is an ungulate (hoofed) mammal.

The Brazilian Tapir is dark brown, with a paler face. It has a short prehensile trunk (like an elephant’s trunk but much shorter). Its trunk can grab branches and leaves or pick fruit from trees. It has a low crest of hair from the crown down the back of the neck. Its round, dark ears have white edges. Its tail is short and stubby.

Continue reading “Brazilian Tapir”