How does a Red-Necked Wallaby Drink?

How does a Red-Necked Wallaby drink?

The Red-Necked Wallaby, also known as the Bennett’s Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus), is a medium-sized macropod marsupial mammal. Macropod means big feet, and a marsupial mammal has a pouch for its baby. 

A group of wallabies is called a mob. It is generally solitary, but it will gather with a mob to feed. It is mainly nocturnal, feeding at night. It is an herbivore, feeding on grass, roots, leaves, and weeds.

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How does the mother kangaroo keep her pouch clean?

How does the mother kangaroo keep her pouch clean?

The Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), the Red Kangaroo (Osphranter rufus), and other kangaroos and wallabies, are Australian marsupial mammals. 

Like all marsupial mammals, the female kangaroo has a pouch where her baby kangaroo, called a joey, grows and is kept safe from harm. 

The marsupial pouch has mammary glands to feed watery milk to her joey. At birth, the joey can be as small as a grain of rice, or as big as a bee. The joey stays in the mother’s pouch for 120-450 days (4-15 months) before it become independent. 

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RESEARCH: Kangaroos can learn to ask humans for help

Research scientists have recently found that kangaroos in zoos and sanctuaries use body language to ask humans for help, much like horses and dogs do. The researchers think this suggests that wild animals can learn to engage in inter-species communication just by being around humans.

Previously, researchers thought that only domesticated animals had the ability to communicate with humans, said Alan McElligott at City University of Hong Kong.

Kangaroos in Australia have never been a domesticated animal. In Australia, there are about 50 million kangaroos that roam in groups, called mobs. But there are also thousands of kangaroos, and other marsupials such as wallabies and pademelons, that live in zoos, parks, and sanctuaries.

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Southern Brown Bandicoot

The Southern Brown Bandicoot (Isodon obesulus) is a marsupial (pouched) mammal in the Peramelemorphia family of short-nosed bandicoots. 

The Southern Brown Bandicoot has a rounded, stocky body with a short snout (nose) and short, rounded ears. It has short, coarse, brown to yellowish-brown fur with black flecks. Its underbelly and legs are creamy-white or yellowish-grey. It has a short, tapered tail that is brown above and white below. It has five pink toes on each foot, with short claws. 

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Bilby

The Bilby (Macrotis lagotis) is a marsupial (pouched) mammal in the Thylacomyidae family of pouched mice. It is also known as the Rabbit-Bandicoot or the Rabbit-Eared Bandicoot. It is related to the Bandicoot.

The Bilby has soft grey or blue-grey fur, with a white underbelly. It looks like a large mouse with a long, pointy nose, whiskers, long hairless rabbit-like ears, and a long tail. Its tail has a white tuft of hair at the tip. It has strong forelimbs (front legs) with large, pointed claws. 

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What are the similarities and differences in the faces of the Kangaroo, Pademelon, Tree-Kangaroo, and Wallaby?

The Kangaroo, Pademelon, Tree-Kangaroo and Wallaby are all macropod (large-footed) marsupial (pouched) mammals.

The Kangaroo, Pademelon, and Wallaby have triangular-shaped faces with black noses, whereas the Tree-Kangaroo has a square-shaped face with a pink nose.

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Plantigrade Locomotion

What is plantigrade locomotion?

Plantigrade locomotion is the way some animals walk with their toes and metatarsals (heels) flat on the ground.

Terrestrial (land) mammals have three ways of walking:

(1) digitigrade (walking on their toes with their heels permanently raised),

(2) unguligrade (walking on the nail of their toes – the hoof – with the heel permanently raised), and 

(3) plantigrade (walking with their toes and heels on the ground).

The leg of a plantigrade mammal includes the bones of the upper leg, called the femur and humerus, and the bones of the lower leg, called the metatarsals and metacarpals. 

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Dusky Pademelon

The Dusky Pademelon (Thylogale brunii) is a small macropod marsupial mammal. It belongs in the Macropodidae family of big-footed mammals. It is also known as the Dusky Wallaby or the Aru Island Wallaby. 

The Dusky Pademelon looks like a mini-kangaroo. It is a stocky marsupial with brown fur with light patches and a white underbelly. It has large ears, a black nose and large brown eyes. It has a short, flat tail. It has two big hind (back) feet with two smaller front feet that act like hands. Its paws are dark-brown to black, with sharp claws. 

It grows to about 50 centimetres (20 inches) tall, with a tail measuring about 50 centimetres (20 inches). 

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Platypus

The Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is a semi-aquatic monotreme (egg-laying) marsupial (pouched) mammal. It is also known as the Duck-Billed Platypus.

The Platypus has a duck-like beak, webbed feet with sharp claws like an otter, an elongated mole-like body, and a broad, flat, beaver-like tail. Its waterproof fur is brown with a whitish underbelly. The male has a venomous spur on it hind (back) feet. The female has a spur, but it is not venomous. It has small brown eyes and small nostrils. 

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Red-Necked Wallaby

The Red-Necked Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus) is a medium-sized macropod marsupial mammal. Macropod means big feet, and a marsupial mammal has a pouch for its baby. It is also known as the Bennett’s Wallaby.

The Red-Necked Wallaby is a stocky marsupial with reddish fur on its neck and shoulders, a black nose, a flat tail, two big hind (back) feet, black paws, and a white stripe on its upper lip. The rest of its body has soft grey fur.  

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Common Brushtail Possum

The Common Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus Vulpecula) is an Australian and New Zealand marsupial mammal. Trichosurus Vulpecula means furry tailed little fox, but it is not a fox, and it is not related to the fox.

The Common Brushtail Possum is silver-grey, brown, black, or a golden colour, with large pointed ears and an extremely bushy tail that can wrap around branches. Its inner ears and nose are pink. It has short, fine black whiskers, and big, round brown eyes. Its feet have sharp claws with a strong grip.

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Tasmanian Tiger

The Tasmanian Tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus) is an extinct Australian marsupial mammal. It was also called Tasmanian Wolf. It was not a tiger, nor a wolf, nor a dog (canid). It was a dog-like animal with stripes called a Thylacine. Extinct means that it is no longer living. The species has died out.

The Tasmanian Tiger was sandy-coloured with short soft hair and dark stripes on its back and its long tail. It had a pouch (similar to kangaroos and other marsupial mammals) to care for its young. Both male and female Tasmanian Tigers had a pouch, but only females had mammary glands in her pouch. It has a dog-like snout, round ears, and dark eyes. It had dog-like paws.

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Tasmanian Devil

The Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a marsupial mammal from Tasmania, Australia. It is a dasyurid.

The Tasmanian Devil has black fur with irregular white patches on its chest and rump. It has a muscular build with a large head, thick neck, and a medium-sized thick tail. Similar to a hyena, its front legs are slightly longer than its back legs. It has five long toes on its front feet and four toes on its back feet, with long non-retractable claws. It has long whiskers on its face.

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CREATURE FEATURE: Koala

The Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal (tree-living) marsupial, found in eastern and southern coastal Australia. It is related to the wombat. It is not a bear.

The Koala has soft, short silver-grey to brown fur. It is a rounded, short animal with a large head with round, fluffy ears. Its underbelly is white. It has no tail. Its nose is black and distinct, and covered with leathery skin. It has curved, sharp claws for climbing trees. The first and second digits on its fore-paws are opposable, enabling it to grasp tree branches. The second and third digits on the hind-paws are fused together. Males have chest glands, which are visible.

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