What is the difference between the Australian Magpie and the Eurasian Magpie?

What is the difference between the Australian Magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) and the Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica)?

The Australian Magpie is a bird in the Artamidae family of butcherbirds, whereas the Eurasian or European Magpie is a bird in the Corvidae family of crows. The Australian Magpie is an artamid and the Eurasian Magpie is a corvid. They are both passerine songbirds.

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RESEARCH: Australian Magpies can remove tracking devices from their legs

The Australian Magpie can remove tracking devices placed on their legs, with help from another magpie. Ornithology is the study of birds and bird behaviour. In a study published in February 2022 in the scientific journal, Australian Field Ornithology, the researchers described Australian Magpies helping each other to remove their tracking devices that the researchers had placed on their legs. 

The Australian Magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen) is a black and white bird in the Artamidae family of butcherbirds. It is not related to the Eurasian or European Magpie (Pica pica) in the Corvidae family of crows. The Australian Magpie is widespread across Australia.

In 2019, animal ecologist Dr. Dominique Potvin and her team of researchers at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Australia, wanted to study magpie social behaviour because they are highly social birds. Social animals, including social birds, are creatures of the same species that live together in family groups, with their own set of behaviour rules, usually with a hierarchy, or order, of interactions. 

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Gallic Eurasian Magpie

The Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica) is a common bird across Eurasia (Europe and Asia). It is related to the crow; therefore, it is a corvid.

The Gallic Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica galliae) is a sub-species of the Eurasian Magpie in western Europe, from France to Italy, but particularly common in France. The photographed birds are from Paris, France.

The Gallic Eurasian Magpie has a black and metallic iridescent green head, neck, and chest. Its belly and shoulder feathers are white. Its wings are black with green and purple. Its tail, legs, and beak are black. Its tail is long. Its eyes are dark-brown.

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CREATURE FEATURE: Red-Billed Blue Magpie

The Red-Billed Blue Magpie (Urocissa erythrorhyncha) is a bird in the corvid family of crows and magpies. 

The Red-Billed Blue Magpie has a black head, black neck, and black chest with bluish spots on its crown. Its shoulders and rump are duller blue and its underparts are greyish-cream. Its long tail is brighter blue with a broad white tip. Its undertail has white bands. Its beak is bright orange-red. Its legs, feet, and eye-rings are also orange-red. 

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Bactrian Eurasian Magpie

The Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica) is a common bird across Eurasia (Europe and Asia). It is related to the crow. It is a corvid.

The Bactrian Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica bactriana) is a sub-species that ranges from east Siberia to the Caucasus, Iraq, Iran, Central Asia and Pakistan. The photographed birds are from Georgia in the Caucasus region.

The Bactrian Eurasian Magpie has a black and metallic iridescent green head, neck, and chest. Its belly and shoulder feathers are white. Its wings are black with green and purple. Its tail is long and black, and its legs and beak are black. Its eyes are dark-brown.

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Australian Black-Backed Magpie

The Australian Black-Backed Magpie (Cracticus tibicen tibicen) is a diurunal medium-sized black and white passerine bird, native to Australia and southern New Guinea. It is found in Queensland and New South Wales in eastern Australia.

They are mainly glossy black, with a few white patches, especially at the back of their necks. They have orange-brown eyes, and a hard, sharp beak.

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