What’s the difference between a Thomson’s Gazelle and a Grant’s Gazelle?

The Thomson’s Gazelle (Gazella thomsonii) is cinnamon-coloured and the Grant’s Gazelle (Gazella granti) is sand-coloured.

The Thomson’s Gazelle lacks white on its body above the tail. The Grant’s Gazelle has white above the tail.

The Thomson’s Gazelle has a black tail. The Grant’s Gazelle has a white tail with a black tuft.

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How does a Parent Bird Feed its Chicks?

How does a parent bird feed its young chicks?

Newly-hatched altricial chicks are born featherless, blind, and helpless.

Chicks open their eyes after about four days. They take time to gain all of their feathers. Initially, the down feathers make young chicks look fluffy. They sit close to their parents to keep warm and safe.

During this time, young chicks stay in the nest. Adult birds look after and feed their young – sometimes, just the mother, sometimes just the father, and other times both the mother and father look after their chicks.

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What’s the difference between giraffe and zebra manure?

What’s the difference beteen giraffe and zebra manure, which is also called dung or poop?

Giraffes and zebras are both ungulate mammals.

Giraffes and zebras are both herbivores, because they both eat vegetation.

Specifically, giraffes are ruminant browsers, eating bushes, leaves, and branches of trees, whereas zebras are cecal grazers, eating mainly grass.

Giraffes have manure similar in texture to sheep manure, whereas zebra manure is similar in texture to horse manure.

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What’s the difference between the Grey Heron and the Black-Headed Heron?

What is the difference between the Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) and the Black-Headed Heron (Ardea melanocephala).

The Grey Heron and the Black-Headed Heron are both large wading birds from the wetlands of Africa.

The Grey Heron has light grey feathers, whereas the Black-Headed Heron has darker grey feathers.

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What’s the difference between Zebras: Common Zebra, Grevy’s Zebra and Chapman’s Zebra

The Common Zebra and the Grévy’s Zebra both have black and white stripes, whereas the Chapman’s Zebra has brown and white stripes with a “shadow” grey stripe.

The Common Zebra and the Chapman’s Zebra look more like short-legged horses, whereas the Grévy’s Zebra looks more like a mule.

The Common Zebra and the Chapman’s Zebra have wider stripes than the Grévy’s Zebra.

The Common Zebra and the Chapman’s Zebra have stripes on their belly, whereas the Grévy’s Zebra has a white unstriped belly.

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What’s the difference between African Plovers: Crowned, Spur-Winged and Long-Toed?

Plovers are wetland or shorebirds, found on mudflats. Of 64 species worldwide, 27 species are native to Africa.

The Crowned Plover (Vanellus coronatus) has yellow eyes.

The Spur-Winged Plover (Vanellus spinosus) has red eyes.

The Long-Toed Plover (Vanellus charadrius crassirostris) has cherry-red eyes with black pupils.

 

The Crowned Plover has a black and white crown (top of head).

The Spur-Winged Plover has a black crown.

The Long-Toed Plover has a white crown.

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Vertebra, Vertebrae, Vertebrate, Vertebrata

What is a vertebra, vertebrae, vertebrate, and Vertebrata?

A vertebra is bone that is part of an animal or human spine. The spine is also called a spinal column or backbone.

Vertebrae are several bones (plural) that form the spine.

A vertebrate is an animal with a spine. The plural is vertebrates.

The subphylum Vertebrata includes all animals in the world that have a spinal column.

Vertebrates include fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.

Invertebrata includes all the animals in the world that do not have a spinal column (‘in’ means without).

Invertebrates include insects, arachnids (spiders), molluscs (snails), crustaceans (crabs), worms, coral, starfish, sponges, and jellyfish.

What’s the difference between Swans: Bewick’s Tundra Swan and the Mute Swan?

The Bewick’s Tundra Swan is smaller than the Mute Swan.

The Bewick’s Tundra Swan has a more rounded head shape than the Mute Swan.

The Bewick’t Tundra Swan has a yellow eye-ring and the yellow of its beak extends to the forehead.

The Mute Swan has black towards it eyes and the black of its beak extends to the forehead.

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Termite Mound

A termite mound is the home of termites. This group of termites live in Africa, while others live in Australia and South America.

Termites are like ants. They live in colonies and build the mounds above an underground nest.

Termites dig into the earth to look for water. As the dig down, they bring the dirt to the surface, and the mound grows as the termites dig further into the soil.

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Alligator Teeth, Crocodile Teeth

Alligator teeth and crocodile teeth are different.

An alligator has a large, fourth tooth in the lower jaw that fits into a socket in the upper jaw.

A crocodile does not have a fourth tooth in the lower jaw.

An alligator’s teeth are not visible when the mouth is closed.

A crocodile’s teeth are visible when the mouth is closed.

Both alligators and crocodiles have between 74 and 80 teeth. As they wear down, they are replaced. They can have 3,000 teeth in a lifetime. Continue reading “Alligator Teeth, Crocodile Teeth”

What’s the difference between Ostriches: Masai Ostrich and Somali Ostrich

The Masai Ostrich (Struthio camelus massaicus) is also called the Pink-Necked Ostrich or the East African Ostrich.

The Somali Ostrich (Struthio molybdophanes) is also called the Blue-Necked Ostrich.

The male Masai Ostrich has a featheless pink neck, pink thighs, and pink legs.

The male Somali Ostrich has a featherless blue neck, grey thighs, and grey legs.

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What’s the Difference between Pelicans: Dalmatian, Australian, Great White, and Pink-Backed?

Pelicans are large white, water birds with long beaks and a large throat pouch.

The Dalmation Pelican (Pelecanus crispus) lives in the Northern Hemisphere, from south-eastern Europe to India and China. It has dirty-grey feathers, with curly feathers on its neck, a pale pink beak with a pale-yellow pouch, pale blue eyes with a white eye-ring, and grey legs. It is the largest pelican. It is 1.6-1.8 metres (4.6-5.7 feet) long with a wingspan of 2.7-3.2 metres (8.9-10.5 feet).

The Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus) lives in the Southern Hemisphere, in Australian and some surrounding islands, such as Fiji. It has neat features with distinctly black back feathers, a pink beak with a pink pouch, and black eyes with a yellow eye-ring. It is 1.6-1.9 metres (5.2-6.2 feet) long with a wingspan of 2.5-3.4 metres (8.2-11.2 feet).

Dalmatian and Australian Pelican

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Cow and Yak – what’s the difference?

The domestic Yak (Bos grunniens) is similar to domestic cattle, such as cows and bulls (Bos taurus or Bos primegenius).

They are both bovids or bovines.

They are both mammals with udders (that provide milk for their calves).

They both eat grass – they are herbivorous grazers.

They are both ungulates – they both have cloven hooves.

The domestic Yak grunts, whereas domestic cattle moo.

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The Ostrich Wing: why the ostrich can’t fly

The Ostrich (Struthio camelus) is a large African flightless bird.

Its wings are also large, with a wingspan of about two metres (6 feet and 7 inches).

Ostriches have many differences from flying birds.

Flying birds have external feathers with hooks that lock together. The Ostrich external feathers do not have tiny hooks that lock together. These hooklets are called barbules. They zip the vanes of individual feathers together to make the feather strong enough to hold the airfoil (the shape of the wing that makes it aerodynamic). Similar foils in water are called hydrofoils.

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African Rhinoceroses: Black and White

What is the difference between African Rhinoceroses – the White Rhinoceros and the Black Rhinoceros?

A White Rhinoceros is grey and a Black Rhinoceros is dark grey.

A White Rhinoceros is larger than a Black Rhinoceros.

A White Rhinoceros has shorter horns than a Black Rhinoceros.

A White Rhinoceros is a grazer (eats grass) and a Black Rhinoceros is a browser (eats leaves and twigs from trees).

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Kenyan Giraffes: What’s the difference between a Masai, a Reticulated and a Rothschild’s Giraffe?

What is the difference between Kenyan giraffes – a Masai, a Reticulated, and a Rothschild’s Giraffe?

A Masai Giraffe has irregular patterns.

A Reticulated Giraffe has regular patterns with a bright chestnut colour and white spaces.

A Rothschild’s Giraffe has brown patterns with cream spaces.

 

Photographer: Martina Nicolls

Martina Nicolls: SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT IN THE ANIMAL KINGDOM

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