Giant Round-Backed Millipede

The Giant Round-Backed Millipede (Pachybolus) is in the Spirobolida Order and Pachybolidae family of round-backed millipedes. It is not an insect, nor an arachnid. It is a diplopod. 

The Giant Round-Backed Millipede has a thick, elongated, cylindrical, segmented body with a hard exo-skeleton. It can be brown-black, red or yellow. Although millipede means a thousand legs, it actually has about 200 legs. It has two pairs of legs per body segment. It has a short head with a number of simple eyes called ocelli – and poor eyesight. It has short antennae.

Giant Round-Backed Millipede

It grows to about 18 centimetres (7 inches) long. 

The Giant Round-Backed Millipede is native to Africa, Madagascar, Seychelles, Brazil, Australia, India, and south-east Asia. It prefers tropical locations. 

It is herbivorous and detritivorous, eating plants, fruit, leaf litter, and decomposing matter. 

It moves in a wave-like motion, with each pair of legs lifted at the same time. As a defence mechanism, it curls up into a coil or ball. 

The female lays about 100 eggs in loose soil.

Giant Round-Backed Millipede
Giant Round-Backed Millipede
Giant Round-Backed Millipede
Giant Round-Backed Millipede

Location of photographs: Paris Zoo, France

Photographer: Martina Nicolls

Martina Nicolls: SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT IN THE ANIMAL KINGDOM

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.