Central African Warthog

The Central African Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus massaicus) is a wild pig found in grassland, savanna, and woodland in Kenya and Tanzania.

The Central African Warthog is heavy-set, medium-sized black or brown hog, ranging from 1.0-1.5 metres (3-5 feet) long, with a mane of hair along its spine. The rest of the body has minimal hair.

It has two pairs of upward-curving tusks protruding from the mouth. One pair of tusks is the upper pair, and the second pair of tusks is the lower pair, which is shorter than the upper pair. The tusks, made of ivory, are used for digging, courtship, and fighting.

Warthog

Central African Warthog

The Central African Warthog has a long tail with a tuft of hair at the end. When the Warthog runs, the tail sticks up in the air. When the Warthog stops running, the tail hangs down.

The Central African Warthog is omnivorous, because it eats almost everything, such as grasses, roots, fruit, bark, insects, eggs and carrion. When Warthogs dig for food, they kneel down on their front feet, which has pads of hard skin.

Warthogs

Warthogs

Warthogs live in groups called sounders. Females live in sounders with their young and with other females. Males form bachelor groups, but live alone when they become adults.

When looking for a mate, it is called courtship or rutting. Females are pregnant for 5-6 months before giving birth to 2-8 live piglets. Piglets become independent after about six months of age.

Warthogs

Female Warthog with her piglets

Many animals eat the piglets, such as lions, leopards, cheetahs, crocodiles, and hyenas.

They live up to 15 years in the wild.

Warthog

Sleeping Warthog

Warthogs

Fighting Warthogs

Warthogs

Warthog

Warthog

Warthog

Warthog

Warthog

 

 

Photographer: Martina Nicolls

Martina Nicolls: SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT IN THE ANIMAL KINGDOM

 

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