Eastern Grey Kangaroo

The Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) is a marsupial mammal found in southern and eastern Australia. Macropus means big feet.

It is about 2 metres (6.6 feet) tall, and is not as tall as the Red Kangaroo. It is the second largest and heaviest living marsupial and native land mammal in Australia.

The Eastern Grey Kangaroo has soft grey fur with a lighter coloured stomach. They have muscular long tails, strong back legs, large feet, short fur and long, pointed ears. Like all marsupials, females have pouches that contain mammary glands, where their young joey lives.

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

The Red Kangaroo likes open arid lands, but the Eastern Grey Kangaroo likes bushlands.

Kangaroos are the only large animals that hop as their main form of locomotion. They can hop 7 metres (15 feet) in a single hop and can hop as fast as 48 kilometres per hour (30 miles per hour).

The tail is a fifth leg, pushing off the ground as they move along.

Kangaroos are social and live in groups called a mob.

Eastern Grey Kangaroos

a mob of Eastern Grey Kangaroos

Kangaroos are herbivores. They eat grasses, flowers, leaves, ferns, moss and even insects. Like cows, kangaroos regurgitate their food and re-chew it before it is ready to be totally digested.

The female Eastern Grey Kangaroo is pregnant for 21-38 days, and she can give birth to up to four offspring at one time, but this is unusual.

At birth, the baby, called a joey, can be as small as a grain of rice, or as big as a bee. The joey stays in the mother’s pouch for 120-450 days.

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

Eastern Grey Kangaroo

 

Photographer: Martina Nicolls

Martina Nicolls: SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT IN THE ANIMAL KINGDOM

 

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